Heritage Fleurieu Coast Tree Trail

Introduction

Welcome to the Heritage Fleurieu Coast tree trail. Trees play an important and sometimes undervalued part in making this area a wonderful place to live and visit. This guide will lead you to some of the trees significant to the district. Included are those which pre-date European arrival and trees endemic to this area as well as those that are part of our more recent heritage, planted as memorials or beautification projects by people with a vision beyond their own lifetimes. This is by no means a comprehensive guide and it is hoped that an online register of significant trees in the district will help to identify and preserve them for the future.

History

For thousands of years, the landscape of the Fleurieu Peninsula was maintained by the Kaurna, Ramindjeri and Ngarrindjeri people through careful and considered use. Following European colonisation this was replaced by systematic clearing of land for agriculture including cropping, grazing, logging, mining and the wattle bark and yacca gum industries. The remaining native vegetation exist in small pockets that should be treasured.
The Fleurieu Peninsula has several main plant associations that can be observed along the trail. The high rainfall, sandy soils of the highlands are dominated by stringybark forest with a dense shrub understory. As rainfall declines, the vegetation opens into woodland, with pink gum and drooping sheoaks becoming important on exposed ridges and hillsides. In the river valleys, rolling hills and flats with deep, fine-grained soils, river red gums and S.A. blue gums become the main trees, widely spaced with a grassy understorey.

The tree trail map courtesy of Joel Catchlove.
The botanical drawing courtesy of Gilbert Dashorst

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Empower the community to enhance the environment of the Fleurieu and to live sustainably.

We acknowledge the heritage of the Kaurna, Narrandjerri and Ramindjeri lands and people of the Fleurieu Coast.
We acknowledge and respect the contributions of successive generations that contribute to the shape of communities of the Fleurieu Coast.